The Tuesday View: 13th June 2017

It was a lovely sunny day today, with a cool breeze, and I actually enjoyed my least favourite garden/household chore – tidying the front hedge and sweeping the drive. I much prefer being in the back garden though. And looking at this view!

The lavender in the foreground is now flowering and the Lysimachia and Golden Rod (which will probably flower early this year) have got so tall. But let’s zoom in to that fluffy white blob in the distance, just to the left of the Acer…

The Goats’ Beard is flowering! And with the strong  breezes we have had, that and the giant Miscanthus left of it have been rustling and swaying like mad.

If I walk a few steps down the path I can show you the view from a slightly different angle – the pink rose at the top of this part of the rockery is now flowering too.

Here is a closer shot…

No name I’m afraid. It was here when we came, albeit rather neglected. It flowers on and off all summer.

Finally a longer shot. If you saw my vase yesterday you will see why I made the choice to use Lysimachia and Alchemilla together. 😉

If you would like to join me with a regular view of one part of your garden, please do!

🙂

 

In a Vase on Monday: Simply Yellow

Along with the Alchemilla mollis, the yellow Lysimachia has been so pretty this year I decided to honour it by using it in a vase this Monday, as I join Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

A few strands of the pretty grass Melica ciliata completed the look.

But my eye was then drawn to a couple of other yellows nearby…

Hypericum polyphyllum, Euphorbia seguieriana and Oenothera missouriensis were then placed in a smaller vase, with some Aruncus dioicus which has just started opening.

The Hypericum (St John’s Wort) is a little early, it usually waits until St John’s Day to flower – the longest day of the year.  Can you believe it is almost midsummer?!

Is anything yellow flowering in your garden right now?

Thanks to Cathy for hosting In a Vase on Monday. She has also found some yellows this week. 😀

Have a great week!

The Tuesday View: 6th June 2017

It’s raining! 😀

We have had light rainshowers on and off all day. Not really enough, but better than nothing! (Update: 3 hours later – those gentle showers have turned into very heavy rain. Yippee!)

Perfect weather for showing my Tuesday View as my garden suddenly looks green again.

In the foreground the Lavender is showing a tinge of colour before it opens. And on the right the tall blue Campanula persicifolia are now open too, while the hardy Geraniums continue to provide splashes of various shades of pink.

The yellow Lysimachia is in full flower. Doesn’t she look harmless?…

The Clematis tangutica ‘Orange Peel’ on the (far too small) obelisk is also in flower…

But my favourite colour here at the moment is this pretty Geranium (I think it is G.’Rozanne’) among some Stipa gigantea; next to the red poppies it stands out even more…

Looking down to the left, at the front of this view, is the lovely Melica ciliata, which I have also seen growing wild on one of our walks nearby.

I pulled loads of the Lysimachia out just a few weeks ago… I could have removed a bit more, but it is lovely while flowering!

As spring progresses into summer, focusing on a particular area of the garden is so useful to me. Why not join in! Just leave a comment below with a link to your view this Tuesday.

Have a great gardening week!

In a Vase on Monday: A Seaside Vignette

My parents visited the British North Norfolk coast last week and sent me this card of Wells beach huts… in the snow! Well, that was perfect for cooling us down in the heatwave! I have never seen snow in Norfolk, so I wonder if this was just an artist’s imagination…

Anyway, it inspired this little ‘vignette’ with my own little beach hut purchased at the Anchor Shop in Blakeney in Norfolk last summer. And, of course, some peonies and Alchemilla.

The postcard with colourful beach huts on the sand is more familiar to me!

The single peony below (no name as it was wrongly labelled as ‘Bowl of Beauty’) has a lemony tinged centre and looked perfect nestled among the Alchemilla flowers. Mmm, like a glass of lemonade!

The main attraction is Peony ‘Festiva maxima’ though. Tinged with pink, its creamy white petals always remind me of ice cream with raspberry sauce! (Something else that would cool me down….)

Today is in fact a lot cooler and this morning was perfect for getting some gardening jobs done. A few showers have barely dampened the soil, so I am still hoping for some rain: May was far too warm and dry. Let’s see what June will bring!

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for hosting this meme!

The Nepal Himalaya Park

Last week we had a bank holiday here in Bavaria – Ascension Day. This meant that an ideal spot for meeting up with friends would be open… the Nepal Himalaya Park near Regensburg.

I have never visited a garden in Germany that captivated me quite like this one! It is most certainly not a traditional ‘show garden’, where plants are placed for effect and labelled with care. No, this was more of a plant fanatic’s paradise, a playground for the owner of the park to see what he can grow, with a mostly oriental theme; a little chaotic, quite wild in places, but absolutely charming in my eyes!

The Nepal Himalaya Pavillon

Photo from the Pavillon website: http://www.nepal-himalaya-pavillon.de

The garden is set into a south-facing hillside in part of a former quarry, and the main ‘attraction’ which inspired it is the Himalaya Pavillon. This temple was actually the Nepalese exhibit at the Expo 2000 in Hanover. It was painstakingly dismantled and rebuilt here in its new home. The garden then arose around it a few years later, so is still relatively young.

My photos are not brilliant as I used my mobile phone, but I think you can get the idea of what the temple looks like surrounded by enormous trees, rhododendrons and azaleas.

I was so pleasantly surprised when I walked through the gate, as it was not at all what I had expected. Along with the traditional perennials, native wild flowers and many herbs there were a lot of unusual plants unknown to me, which I had to look up when I got home. So if you see I have made a mistake, please feel free to correct me!

Only recently I had looked up Amsonia, when Jason from Garden in a City mentioned them. Then there they were – the first flower I laid my eyes on and the first time I had seen one.

Amsonia illustris

I found the foliage particularly striking.

As we walked down a slope past a pond, I noticed Anthericum everywhere, along with patches of blue Corydalis and various Euphorbias.

This plant kept popping up too… I believe it is a type of Echium, although I personally only know the blue sort that grows by the roadsides here.

Echium amoenum

The Japanese garden didn’t do much for me, but as we passed that we came to a shadier area where hostas and ferns were thriving…

I wonder if anyone can tell me what the tall plant is between the yellow irises and poppies… It looks kind of familiar.

Along the way there were small temples, bells and a prayer wheel – all original pieces shipped from Nepal. But I was focussed on the plants!

Lilac

The newest part of the garden is the Chinese Garden – it is very wild, overrun with native wild flowers, but still managing to make quite an impact with the wooden bridges and gateways placed at intervals and the setting itself in the rockiest part of the old quarry is fairly dramatic…

Finally, the plant of the day: Lupins!

On our way home we noticed blue ones growing by the roadsides – something we don’t see in our valley at home.

The website is unfortunately all in German, but there is a virtual tour of the garden here, navigable without any language.

And should you ever visit this part of the world, I would definitely recommend this to serious plant lovers! What kind of gardens do you like to visit best – wild and weedy or formal and tidy? 😉