Nepal Himalaya Park, Germany: July 2021

Not far from us a wonderful garden nestles on a stony hillside on the edge of the Bavarian Forest and above the River Danube.

Within its grounds stands the Expo 2000 Nepalese Pavilion – a Buddhist Temple and Hindi Stupa all in one. After being dismantled after the exhibition, it was transported here and rebuilt by the Nepalese craftsmen, setting the theme for the garden which has grown up around it. The garden has since been extended a great deal and although it is only open three afternoons a week in the summer months it has become one of the most popular attractions in the region.

There are not many gardens in the south of Germany that are open to the public, and none at all that could be compared with the famous English gardens. So it is always a treat to visit this one which is more like a park than a garden and allows nature to play a hand.

The owner is an avid plant collector and has many unusual plants from the Himalaya region and Asia in general. But there are also native plants, flowers and trees mixed in with the more exotic.

On this particular visit the Hydrangeas were a highlight…

…as well as the Lilies…

…and the gorgeous pale yellow hollyhocks that have popped up everywhere…

Dotted around the grounds are various temples, gates, bridges, bells, prayer wheels, statues and figures that have been brought over from Asia or built in that style.

I like the ones that blend in with the planting best, but they do all add to the atmosphere, which is unique; the buzz of conversation at the entrance gate slowly subsides to a quiet hum as visitors move down past the pond and are drawn into the tranquility of the garden.

There are distinctive areas – the Japanese Garden, the Pond, the Chinese and Herb Gardens and the large area covering an old stone quarry, with bridges and bridge ‘houses’ along a pathway winding its way across, up and down the side of the hill. That is the part of the garden I like best, where nature is allowed to determine which flower or grass may dominate each year.

This year has been very wet and the native Melica ciliata has spread, creating a beautiful effect with the Coreopsis, Euphorbia, Perovskia and Eryngium.


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The temple itself is a focal point, with calming chants played in the background creating a very peaceful place to just sit and take a break. It was built as both a Buddhist temple and Hindu stupa, as a symbol of tolerance and understanding of the two religions.

Regular events raise money for the Nepal Himalaya Foundation established by the owners.

But I was there for the plants. And for inspiration, like this somewhat overgrown and wild spiral bed…

Or this glorious planting combination of spiky leaves, pink phlox and yellow lilies…

My friend and I took hundreds of photos, so this is just a taste of the flair and tranquility this garden has to offer. Hope you enjoyed the mini tour!

😃

https://www.nepal-himalaya-pavillon.de

And a link to a youtube video (only music) made by photographer Tobias Lindenmeir (https://www.naturphoto.net ):

A Week of Flowers Day Five, 26th November 2020

In my Week of Flowers 2020 (I think this will have to become an annual event!) I have found some photos of some gorgeous pink flowers to share.

I hope you are having a good week, and a lovely Thanksgiving if you are in the U.S.

If you would like to join me in my Week of Flowers, please do! We really can brighten these grey days by sharing our favourite and most colourful flowers from our 2020 gardens. ☀️ Just leave a link to your conribution in the comments below so that we can find your post. Thanks!

Garden Tours

 

I visited a garden today – in Cornwall, England.

https://ngs.org.uk/carminowe-valley-garden-cornwall-a-garden-worth-exploring/

Absolutely beautiful! 🌸

And then I popped into one in Derbyshire later on.    

https://ngs.org.uk/the-smithy-derbyshire-a-hidden-treasure/

Charming. 😃

How did I do that, you may ask? Do I have a private jet? A helicopter? Can I beam myself from Bavaria to England? (Wish I could!)

No, I looked at NGS charity website and clicked on the button for Virtual Garden Visits.

https://ngs.org.uk/virtual-garden-visits/

When it became clear that the NGS (National Garden Scheme) gardens would be unable to open their gates to the public in spring in order to raise money for the nurses they support, the charity decided to share some virtual garden tours on their website instead. At the peak of the lockdown this was such a wonderful way to while away a few hours and escape reality, viewing some enchanting gardens all across Britain.

Mum‘s Pink Poppy

Well, with some of the restrictions being lifted in the UK, most of the gardens are now open at last, albeit with the booking of time slots as a requirement. Details of the gardens are up-to-date on the website and booking a time slot can be done online too. It‘s really easy.

Californian Poppies

If you can‘t visit one yourself, or there isn‘t one near you, do take a look at some of the virtual tours instead. And perhaps you might consider making a small donation while you are on the website? The charity has almost reached its target of £100,000  for its Help Support our Nurses campaign launched in April. Every little helps.

And here is a mini tour of my own garden in Bavaria as it stands so far. 😃

xxx