Ice, End of November 2020

We had some rather pretty ice last week. But as the days went by, with fog freezing onto the plants and trees in layers, I was a little worried. Thank goodness it melted on Monday as my grasses were groaning under the weight; shaking them had no effect, this ice was SOLID!

Brrrr! Winter is here! Is it winter in your garden today?

❄️☃️❄️

 

A Week of Flowers Day Six, 27th November 2020

The idea of A Week of Flowers 2020 was to raise our spirits and brighten up these dismal grey November days. I think it has done just that, thanks to all those participating! We have seen some fabulous flowers (and bees, butterflies, etc) and I have certainly been reminded of summer days, spring sunshine and autumn foliage. So let’s continue with day six! Photos from late summer in the Sunshine Bed today…

It is not too late to join in. Just post a photo of a flower or two from your 2020 garden and leave a comment below with a link to your post.

Thank you for visiting!

 

A Week of Flowers Day Five, 26th November 2020

In my Week of Flowers 2020 (I think this will have to become an annual event!) I have found some photos of some gorgeous pink flowers to share.

I hope you are having a good week, and a lovely Thanksgiving if you are in the U.S.

If you would like to join me in my Week of Flowers, please do! We really can brighten these grey days by sharing our favourite and most colourful flowers from our 2020 gardens. ☀️ Just leave a link to your conribution in the comments below so that we can find your post. Thanks!

In a Vase on Monday: Anastasia

On Mondays Cathy at Rambling in the Garden invites us to join her in sharing material from our gardens. A lovely way to start the week!

This pretty little Chrysanthemum – ‘Anastasia’ – has been flowering beautifully for me since October, despite rain, fog and then frosts. So before it starts looking too shabby around the edges I decided to pick some for today’s vase.

I was late to discover the joy of Chrysanthemums, as some of the big pompom ones can be a bit….. well, overwhelming? But this hardy C. indicum has small button flowers and just when you think the garden is going into hibernation it starts flowering! In addition, when I picked these on Saturday there were still some bees on it, after 4 degrees of frost that night. So, my message for today is to give Chrysanthemums a chance! 😉

Have a good week!

The Yard in November 2020

Everyone has a problem area on their property don’t they? Well, in terms of planting, our problem area is our yard.

The yard is a large paved area between the house, barn and garage, and in summer it heats up immensely. In the summer months it is brightened up by geraniums (well, Pelargoniums actually). They are about the only flowers that do not wilt in the heat, and it is clear why they are such a tradition on Bavarian yards and balconies.

Here you can see some in late summer, also planted around the bamboo in the huge green pot.

But this year I tried planting up some additional pots with shrubs and plants that should also overwinter. Not easy when considering how shady the yard is in winter and that we may have temperatures constantly below zero for several weeks. In emergencies I can put a few plants in the barn for a few nights. Anyway, we will see if we get a mild winter again…

Violas are great for autumn pots, as they simply freeze in winter and return as soon as the first rays of spring sunshine warm them up. The Carex will last a couple of years in a pot and will then be planted out in the garden, as will the violas next May, and new Pelargoniums will take their place.

I also like to use small conifers in my pots. Again, they will be planted out into the garden once they get too big.

Below you will also see a red rose, some small sedum, dianthus, carex, a pale pink Potentilla and a dwarf Buddleia.

I am hoping these will all prove to be hardy enough and will come back next year.

On the other side of the barn doors is the sledge, which will have a small potted Christmas tree in it soon, and be decorated with fairy lights for some essential Advent kitsch! I may go over the top this year; with Christmas markets banned I will need some extra sparkle at home. 😉

And here are the pots on that side of the barn too. On the left, a Hippophae rhamnoides, or Sea Buckthorn. This one is male and will not bear berries as I want it for its foliage here. It is supposedly very hardy and takes any amount of heat, wind or frost.

The next pot is Itea virginica ‘Little Henry’, another very hardy and heat tolerant plant, and it has absolutely gorgeous autumn colour.

A yellow summer Daisy is tucked in behind it, already damaged by frost but still flowering!

If the Itea and Buckthorn survive our north winds in winter they will get bigger pots next year as a reward. 😃

You can also see some grasses in the picture above – Imperata cylindrica ‘Red Baron’ and Hakonechloa – then another rose (The Fairy), and the wonderful burnt caramel  of the Spiraea japonica ‘Magic Carpet’. This small shrub looks lovely when it flowers, but the autumn foliage and fresh green shoots in spring are why I chose it.

I still have a couple of summer plants left. All the pelargoniums went a couple of weeks ago but I can’t bring myself to put this pretty little purple daisy on the compost until the last flower dies.

I don’t even know its name, but it has been beautiful all summer!

And here is another summer daisy that didn’t flower until it cooled down a bit in September. It seems to like chilly and damp November days!

 

Finally I planted up one little winter pot with a new creamy white Hellebore, an erica and some wintery white violas.

I have already potted up lots of tulips which will bring extra colour to the yard in late spring.

So I am almost ready for winter now.

How about you? Are you and your garden ready for winter? Have you got any containers for winter interest? How cold can it get in your part of the world?

Thanks for visiting. And happy gardening!