In a Vase on Monday: (N)ice Surprise

The sun came out again today and yet there is still some frost and ice on the trees on the shadow side and the temperature up on our hill barely rose above freezing. So I was absolutely sure I would not find anything but grasses for my vase today.

I was wrong!

My first Hellebore to flower is ‘Diva’, which was in a pot by the front door last year and was planted out in spring. Still shy and not quite open, but with many more buds on it, so I felt this one could be cut in the hope she will survive a few days in a vase.

But the biggest surprise was this Geum bud… will it open I wonder?

The seedhead is also from the Geum, the grass is my favourite Miscanthus ‘Federweisser’ and the foliage is from my Geraniums… I think Rozanne, and from a Heuchera. The red stems are from a young willow and I think they broke off under the weight of the ice (or maybe a hare has had a nibble?!).

So I am very happy to be joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her Monday meme, without which I would not have discovered these treasures before our first snow falls! (Supposedly tonight. โ˜ƒ๏ธ)

Thanks to Cathy for hosting In a Vase on Monday. Do visit her to see what she has found in her garden to share today.

Have a great week!

 

The Yard in November 2020

Everyone has a problem area on their property don’t they? Well, in terms of planting, our problem area is our yard.

The yard is a large paved area between the house, barn and garage, and in summer it heats up immensely. In the summer months it is brightened up by geraniums (well, Pelargoniums actually). They are about the only flowers that do not wilt in the heat, and it is clear why they are such a tradition on Bavarian yards and balconies.

Here you can see some in late summer, also planted around the bamboo in the huge green pot.

But this year I tried planting up some additional pots with shrubs and plants that should also overwinter. Not easy when considering how shady the yard is in winter and that we may have temperatures constantly below zero for several weeks. In emergencies I can put a few plants in the barn for a few nights. Anyway, we will see if we get a mild winter again…

Violas are great for autumn pots, as they simply freeze in winter and return as soon as the first rays of spring sunshine warm them up. The Carex will last a couple of years in a pot and will then be planted out in the garden, as will the violas next May, and new Pelargoniums will take their place.

I also like to use small conifers in my pots. Again, they will be planted out into the garden once they get too big.

Below you will also see a red rose, some small sedum, dianthus, carex, a pale pink Potentilla and a dwarf Buddleia.

I am hoping these will all prove to be hardy enough and will come back next year.

On the other side of the barn doors is the sledge, which will have a small potted Christmas tree in it soon, and be decorated with fairy lights for some essential Advent kitsch! I may go over the top this year; with Christmas markets banned I will need some extra sparkle at home. ๐Ÿ˜‰

And here are the pots on that side of the barn too. On the left, a Hippophae rhamnoides, or Sea Buckthorn. This one is male and will not bear berries as I want it for its foliage here. It is supposedly very hardy and takes any amount of heat, wind or frost.

The next pot is Itea virginica ‘Little Henry’, another very hardy and heat tolerant plant, and it has absolutely gorgeous autumn colour.

A yellow summer Daisy is tucked in behind it, already damaged by frost but still flowering!

If the Itea and Buckthorn survive our north winds in winter they will get bigger pots next year as a reward. ๐Ÿ˜ƒ

You can also see some grasses in the picture above – Imperata cylindrica ‘Red Baron’ and Hakonechloa – then another rose (The Fairy), and the wonderful burnt caramel ย of the Spiraea japonica ‘Magic Carpet’. This small shrub looks lovely when it flowers, but the autumn foliage and fresh green shoots in spring are why I chose it.

I still have a couple of summer plants left. All the pelargoniums went a couple of weeks ago but I can’t bring myself to put this pretty little purple daisy on the compost until the last flower dies.

I don’t even know its name, but it has been beautiful all summer!

And here is another summer daisy that didn’t flower until it cooled down a bit in September. It seems to like chilly and damp November days!

 

Finally I planted up one little winter pot with a new creamy white Hellebore, an erica and some wintery white violas.

I have already potted up lots of tulips which will bring extra colour to the yard in late spring.

So I am almost ready for winter now.

How about you? Are you and your garden ready for winter? Have you got any containers for winter interest? How cold can it get in your part of the world?

Thanks for visiting. And happy gardening!

 

In a Vase on Monday: Remembering Summer

A mild and dry day today meant I could finally get my last planting finished… got all my bulbs in! ๐Ÿ˜œ And my new Moon Bed is ready for its layer of wood chippings as soon as the ground dries up a bit.ย (I’ll show a picture of that when it’s complete).ย I also tidied up some bedraggled and mildewy plants and picked a few blooms for a vase…

Now doesn’t that remind you of summer?!

(Big sigh)

I used the round vase my sister gave many moons ago… I always think of using this vase when we have a full moon, especially a blue moon. ๐Ÿ˜‰

I didn’t have many blue flowers for a blue moon theme, but my white Aster ‘Schneetanne’ was a good start, Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ also has moon-like qualities, and the blue Scabiosa does actually look blue in a certain light, but I’d say mauve is more accurate to describe it.

The pink at the back is my first pink Chrysanthemum to open… they do add some summery colour late in the season. A purply pink one is also nearly open, so it might appear in a vase next week!

I also added some catmint and red Polygonum spikes. It is a lovely ground cover variety, Polygonum affine ย ‘Darjeeling Red’, which flowers all summer and autumn and has pretty foliage too.

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Thanks to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for hosting this meme. It is such a lovely way to record what is in the garden and connect with other gardens across the world.

As many of us in Europe enter a new phase of lockdowns to varying degrees, I hope you have something good to read or a few projects to keep your spirits up. My thoughts are with you all.

Good luck!