The Garden in June, 2021: Part One

Blogging is not only a wonderful way to learn from and share ideas with other bloggers, but it is also an excellent way of keeping a record of the garden at various times of year. I do write down what I have planted and where – I have a large album for that – but seeing how things work together in photos is even better. So here is a look at the garden in June. Today I will focus on the Vegetable Plot, the Oval Bed and the Butterfly Bed.

The Vegetable Plot is new this year and seems to be doing well so far. The zucchini and butternut got off to a slow start, and cucumbers had to be replanted after a very cold May, but they now seem to be doing better. The Kohlrabi will be much bigger than I thought, and runner beans have only just started sprouting. Some of my lettuce is being grazed (!) but on the whole salad leaves, chard, dill and the strawberries are also growing well.

(Click on any photo to enlarge as a slideshow)

The Butterfly Bed was planted in October 2018 and this is the first year where the Alchemilla, Geraniums, Salvia pratensis and Nepeta have competed with each other to see who can get the tallest! One of the Nepeta has already lost, and has flopped, the Salvia is over and can be cut back for a second flowering later, but the Alchemilla and the Geraniums are enormous!

I widened the back of the bed last autumn and it is already filling out. I like the tall upright Calamagrostis here. And the buddleia have recovered fully from the winter and are leafing out nicely.

In the centre you can see the very tall Knautia macedonia ‘Melton Pastels’ flowers. They spread by seed and seem to be taller than ever this year. The flowers vary from pale pink to a deep wine red.

I moved this tiny Clematis integrifolia ‘Baby Blue’ last year and it seems really happy on this corner now, with a bit of shade later in the day from the buddleia next to it.

Finally, the Oval Bed. This was planted in our hot dry Spring last year and has got established really well.

The Stipa tenuissima gives the structure, along with three obelisks planted with Clematis. The red one below is Nubia, and the purple one Arabella.

A bird bath will eventually be a feature in the green inner area of the oval. Below, the Centranthus ruber will hopefully attract moths, especially the Hummingbird Hawk Moth. This blue Veronica austriaca ‘Knallblau’ is such a fabulous deep shade of blue that I planted another one in the Moon Bed this year.

Some Allium Purple Rain are still flowering in this bed, while the first annual Cosmos (Daydream) are just opening.

A peony I planted here last spring has recently flowered for the first time and has reminded me why I chose it… Paeonia lactiflora ‘Dancing Butterfly’ is a delcate shade of pink quite unlike some of the photos on the internet, with a creamy pink-tinged centre.

I hope you enjoyed a look around my garden. Part Two coming soon will focus on the Moon Bed, Herb Bed, Sunshine Bed and the latest project; The ‘Edge. 😃

Thank you for reading!

 

In a Vase on Monday: The Old and the New

It’s Monday, and I am joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her lovely meme.

At this time of year it is not hard to find something pretty for a vase. I wanted to capture the last of the daffodils before they go over (The Old) but also saw the first Camassia was opening (The New). Then, well, you know how it is…. I just got carried away! 😃

The aging Hellebore flowers and their fresh leaves formed a base. Then the Narcissi, some Pulmonaria ‘Opal’, Aquilegia, a Camassia and some Geranium phaeum were added.

The Pulmonaria has a slight pink tinge to it, and really does remind me of the semiprecious stone.

The last three Narcissi hanging on in the Oval Bed are all miniatures. I think they are later to emerge because the wood chipping mulch on that bed keeps it cooler longer in spring. All three are beautifully scented.

This is Hawera, which I have in the Herb Bed too, and it has spread well there within the last couple of years.

The next one is the multiheaded ‘Silver Chimes’. It is so delicate and a lovely pale creamy white… it has become one of my favourites now.

The very last one is Baby Moon. So sweet, and such a delicate yellow.

The pink Aquilegia is a new one planted a few weeks ago, aptly called ‘Rosa Rosa’ and attracting bees even during the frequent showers we have been having. It is one of the few I have seen that tilts its flowers upwards so you can actually see them. 😃

Not only did I get carried away picking flowers, I also took rather a lot of photos! So here are all of them together as a slideshow. Enjoy!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Wishing you all a flowery week!

😃

 

In a Vase on Monday: Cool!

Joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her Monday meme is always a pleasure, and now that the garden is beginning to get established I have more choice of spring flowers to pick. My cowslip is doing well on the edge of the Oval Bed, as you can see in this first photo, and I hope it will eventually spread into the grass. 😃

My little jug is crammed full of Hellebores: Prince Double White, Ice ‘N’ Roses red, and ‘Carlotta’. I also used the no-name Pulmonaria hybrid brought over from my old garden, which is an enormous plant now. Then cowslips and a few Narcissi for some sunny yellow.

I am no good at remembering daffodil names, but I think this paler one from the Moon Bed is ‘Sailboat’. There are still a few sorts that haven’t opened yet, but at least they will last longer in our cool spring. (You have to be positive, don’t you! 😉)

Have a great week, and hopefully a warmer one! 😉

My Grasses in Winter

As my regular readers will have gathered by now, I love grasses!

🌾🌾🌾

I simply do not have enough of them and hope to remedy that over the next few years. But today I thought I would reflect on those that stand up to winter best in my garden.

 

First of all my favourite Pennisetum, on the corner of the Herb Bed.

Pennisetum alooecuroides var. viridescens

It is a bushy plant with compact growth which means the dark seedheads remain pretty stable all winter, even with a lot of snow on them. This is a windy corner too, and extremely hot and dry in summer, but the Pennisetum is completely unperturbed by wind or drought. Definitely a thumbs up for this one. 👍

Miscanthus Red Chief and Adagio with Calamagrostis (Karl Foerster) in the Butterfly Bed are still looking fairly fresh and are completely intact.

The Calamagrostis thins down a little over winter making less of a statement, but remains tall and straight with virtually no flopping. Red Chief loses its pink tinge a little, but is a lovely golden brown with a touch of bronze on the seedheads.

Adagio (the smaller Miscanthus further down the bed) flops a little and is more susceptible to the snow, but again it is still a lovely golden brown. Thumbs up!

At the far end of the Butterfly Bed (far left)is Miscanthus sinensis Hermann Müssel…

I am afraid he hasn’t done well for two years in a row so if he doesn’t take off this summer I will move him to another spot. Not one I would chose in future.

Then we have Miscanthus ‘Federweißer’ in the Moon Bed…

…and in the Oval Bed (on the left).

Wonderful! I fell in love with this plant in spring 2020 and now have two fabulous specimens. These are keepers! 👍

The other Miscanthus in the Oval Bed at the front is Beth Chatto. I must say I was not that impressed in the summer, but this is a very sturdy plant with tough stems and has stood up to heavy wet snow quite well. The seedheads have lasted well too.

So, nice for winter interest but with less impact in summer.

Finally, the Erogrostis trichodes…

Despite being on the windiest corner (and getting smothered in heavy snow this winter) it still has the ability to look pretty whatever the weather. Raindrops or frost enable this little grass to stand out, making it a must for my winter garden. It adds some extra sparkle. 😃 (Oh, and do you see those hare pawprints in the snow in the background?!) 🐇

The Panicums and another Miscanthus in the Sunshine Bed have long collapsed or look very dishevelled. I love the strong background they give to this bed in summer among the Helianthus. But they offer very poor winter interest. I know from other bloggers that some Panicums stand up better than others, but I think I prefer to stick with what has already proved successful in this garden… Calamagrostis, Pennisetum and the Miscanthus I have mentioned. More of these will be part of my spring 2021 project.

By the way, my Stipa tenuissima have all been completely buried by the snow. I wonder how long it will take for them to stand up again when it melts….

What grasses do you grow, and do they still look good now? Any recommendations for warm and dry spots would be much appreciated!

Have a great weekend! 💕