A Walk around the November Garden

Instead of a video I thought I would take you on a walk around the garden with photos this month. It means I can focus on particular plants (and look up the names I have forgotten! πŸ˜‰).

So get yourself a cup of something warming and join me on the tour. β˜€οΈβ˜•οΈπŸ

First of all, a frosty morning view of the Oval Bed Β with the new (unfinished) Moon Bed behind it. (More on the Moon Bed in another post). The grasses are Stipa tenuissima and Miscanthus ‘Federweisser’.

Stipa tenuissima and Miscanthus Federweisser

The Butterfly Bed is still quite pink! It is home to a wonderful pink Aster and a lovely pink Chrysanthemum – ‘Anastasia’ – that is unperturbed by rain and frost..

Let’s have a closer look…

The other side of the Butterfly Bed has been widened and I hope to make it look more interesting that side too next summer. There are already some Asters which have mostly gone over now, and Geranium Rozanne has been added to this side for summer interest. I have also planted some bulbs on this side.

Rozanne is still flowering, even after several frosts!

The sedums are turning brown, but as long as they remain standing I will not chop them down. The tall grass in the background is Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’.

Now let’s look at the Herb Bed.

A couple of the Stipa grasses have been replaced with seedlings. They do produce an awful lot of seedlings but they are very easy to remove and replant.

A surprise bloom or two on the Echinacea and Geum are providing the last splashes of colour in this bed.

Moving across to the Oval Bed now, you can see some Verbena bonariensis still standing. On the right is Miscanthus Federweisser. It really does have very silvery seedheads… the palest I have seen. It is for that reason that I planted the same one in the Moon Bed.

These are the seedheads of Echinacea ‘Green Envy’…

And a dear little Polygonum/Bistorta affinis ‘Darjeeling Red’ that has appeared in vases on and off all year. It flowers all summer, with shades varying from very pale pink to bright red, and I think the seedheads and foliage are also attractive, especially at this time of year.

The pale pink Arctanthemum arctica that I featured in a vase a few weeks ago has now gone over, but after removing the flower stalks the foliage below was surprisingly fresh and I am hoping it will remain green a bit longer.

Another Chrysanthemum (C. indicum ‘Oury’) is open in this bed too. A lovely deep pinky red. It should get a bit bushier by next year.

So if you are still with me (!) let’s have a quick look at the Sunshine Bed…

The Helianthus had to come out as they were mildewy. I shall leave the rest of the perennials standing as long as possible.

Here is a Chrysopsis still in flower…

And the lovely very late flowering Aster ericoides ‘Schneetanne’…

And finally a glimpse towards the Larch ‘Forest’ beyond the Sunshine Bed…

And looking back towards the Oval, Butterfly and Moon Beds. Eventually these will all be linked up… πŸ˜‰

Thank you for joining me. I hope you enjoyed the tour. I will share some pictures of the containers in the yard soon as well.

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Wishing you some autumn sunshine. All my photos were taken over the past week, but since Monday we are in thick fog again today with no prospect of it clearing for a few days!

Happy gardening!

 

In a Vase on Monday: Flowers from the Sunshine Bed

Today was one of those chilly and grey autumn days, damp and drizzly, where the best place to be is in the kitchen with the oven on, making soup and baking bread. πŸ˜ƒ

But it was also a Monday, and since I missed posting a vase last Monday I really wanted to participate in Cathy’s meme this week. So in between rainshowers I collected some flowers from my Sunshine Bed (which is living up to its name even in October). β˜€οΈ

Here are a couple of photos taken last week, before the latest rain. The Β mice/voles are very active in this bed, but I have realised that I have lost fewer plants to them than to the slugs and snails in my last garden!

On the left is the very tall Helianthus ‘Sheila’s Sunshine’. I wasn’t sure about this plant at first, as it just looks tall and weedy for so long before flowering. But the pale lemon flowers, the dark green of the foliage and the reddish stems create quite a lovely result after much else has gone over.

Another star in this bed at the moment is the Chrysopsis. I grew this in my last garden too and it is so lovely to have some sunshine yellow going on into November.

The orange Chrysanthemum ‘Indian Summer’ has also not disappointed. One succumbed to the mammals, but this one has survived and is very visible from the house even on a foggy day like today.

In the last few days a cloud of white snowflakes has appeared on the right of the bed… this Aster in my vase is called ‘Schneetanne’ and has tiny white flowers. A wonderful sight in the October garden!

A few grasses and some Alchemilla mollis are fillers, along with a golden stem of Euphorbia called ‘Goldturm’, an Echinacea seedhead, and the very last Tithonia.

Such a shame October is coming to an end. It has been wet here, but as glorious as always!

Do visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to see what she has found for her vase today.

And have a great week!

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Garden Tour, Early September 2020

My first video of the garden was early July, and I had planned to do one a month. Well, August was simply too hot to do anything, let alone take photos or make videos. But now the garden has recovered from the heat and temperatures are in the low 20s.

My Geum chiloense Blazing Sunset and the Geranium Rozanne have been flowering non-stop throughout the heat, and now the late summer flowers are beginning to open too.

So here is the garden tour for September. I hope you enjoy it! Click on the link and turn the sound up!

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Cosmos in Comparison

I believe most of the gardeners I know have at some stage grown Cosmos in their gardens. If you haven’t yet done so I would really recommend you to try. I have grown various ones over the years, so I thought I would do a little review of some that have thrived for me.

In Germany and in the UK they are sown in Spring and then planted out as soon as the danger of frosts is over. Such a shame they aren’t perennial! But they really are worth it as they are easy to grow.

First of all, Cosmos Double Click Cranberries. I have grown this one several times, and it has always germinated successfully, producing sturdy plants which flower profusely without too much foliage.

The petals have varied between plants, as you can see here. The single flower is one that set seed from last year’s crop.

I had forgotten there are quite a few in this series, and looking through old photos I grew this pink one – Double Click Rose Bonbon – some years ago.

I think that will go in my seed order for next year. πŸ˜‰

 

Another one I have grown frequently is Purity….

As much as I love the pure white flowers and the sturdy stems, I have to say I will not grow this one again as it produces just far too much thick foliage on a lot of the plants, and only the odd plant seems to produce plentiful flowers. (See what I mean in the photo below?)

If you have grown another single white one which you liked, please let me know!

Next, one I grew for the first time this year: Daydream. It is a big success!

Pretty pink flowers, sturdy stems, nice height and not too much foliage.

… and here again complete with bumbling visitor…

One to consider for my seed list for next year.

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This next one is one I grew a few years ago: Xanthos…

I loved the pale lemony yellow flowers, but was a bit disappointed that it had so many flowers on the end of each stem making deadheading pretty tricky. Lovely in vases though.

Further away from the traditional pinks and mauves is this yellow and orange mix called Brightness Mixed…

One of these (pictured with Margerites) is Cosmos sulphureus, but is hard to tell apart from the pale orange ones in the mix. All were very prolific on the flower front, but these are not so tall. Perhaps only 30 -40 cm. Perfect for pots though. πŸ˜ƒ

Antiquity is one I discovered last year. It is also a relatively short one, but the way the petals fade, like fabric bleached by the sun, is so endearing. Here it is in a vase with the Double Click Cranberries…

One disadvantage though is that they do look messy if not deadheaded frequently, don’t you think?…

I tend to have irregular deadheading sessions, largely dependent on whether it is too hot or not! So I think I will drop this one from my palette in future.

Others I have grown are Picotee and Candy Stripe, both pale pink. Here is Candy Stripe, second from the left, with the distinctive pinky red fringe on its petals…

There are probably a couple more I have grown in the past, but before the digital age took off, so no photos to remind me! (Oh, I am showing my age! … We were chatting recently about the days when you had to find a telephone box to make a phone call, and how I always made sure I had some change in my purse! LOL!)

Anyway, it would be so lovely if you could post about some of the Cosmos you have grown, or at least leave me a comment about your experience with them and any favourites. πŸ˜ƒ

Thanks for visiting!

In a Vase on Monday: Standing Out in the Crowd

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling in the Garden invites us to join her in presenting a vase of things found in our gardens or nearby.

So, here I am again with a rather nice posy for my mantlepiece, photographed in the wet Oval Bed. Yes, we had RAIN! πŸ˜ƒπŸ˜€πŸ˜

 

The Euphorbia always gets so tall, and when it then rains it tends to flop everywhere, so I cut a few straggly bits as a crown. The jewel at the centre, standing out well against the lime green, is the Echinacea I used a couple of weeks ago… Green Envy. I raved about it then and will rave about it now. I simple love it!

The vase I chose because it reminded me of raindrops. πŸ˜ƒ

Wishing you all a week of calm weather, as hurricanes and heatwaves hit the headlines across the world. It is set to warm up again here in a few days, but after this cooler rainy start to the weekΒ we should be able to cope with the heat a bit longer. And we do, after all, need the sun for my tomatoes to ripen!

Happy gardening!